Children with Mood Issues: A Case Study and A NEATS Assessment

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I gave up gluten because of a thyroid problem and three days later I woke up to a different world. The major depression that I had suffered with my whole life was lifted…. It is amazing to me how a thing like gluten could cause such a change…. I had spent a fortune on physiatrists and psychologists and was way overmedicated to the point where I was shaking.

Also I dropped 25 lbs so quickly that I thought there was something wrong with me…. They have improved the quality of gluten free food since I quit so I have gained some of that weight back but now I work out so it is not an issue. I am just happy to not be fighting depression every day. I gave up gluten and have not looked back since…. Refined grains of all kinds are what seemed to be associated with a higher risk of depression in these studies. Glad to see this topic getting the attention it deserves. Keep up the good work. We discovered the diet mental health connection some years ago.

Why is your child so angry?

The elimination of gluten made an enormous night and day difference for the better. While celiac was in the immediate family, without the classic symptoms we never made the connection to mental health, anxiety and ability to focus. Hope more research is done in this area. Depression is the result of a deficiency in key brain nutrients. Poor diet and stress are the root causes. Also, boosting Omega-3 and rejecting Omega-6 food sources is essential. The medical research has been done, we just have to connect the dots. I eat the diet you are suggesting and have been a healthy eater for decades.

Diet is often only part of the solution. Treatment options for depression include medications, therapy, and self-care. Self-care includes things like sleep, physical activity, and diet, and is just as important as meds and therapy. The body is a complex machine. Diet and exercise are important, but genetics is too.

Learning Objectives

In the case of depression, MTHFR mutations play a significant role as they impact the methylation cycle, that produces many neuro-transmitters. By supplementing you can optimize this cycle and compensate for faulty genetics. Genetics also conditions how fast you metabolize fat, carbs, caffeine… So adapting your diet to your genetics is extremely important. We are also discovering the role of microbes and their interactions with our body.

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Diet definitely impacts those microbes. We need a holistic and personalized approach to health. The evidence-based jury is still out on MTHFR gene mutations and links to any diagnosis or treatment. Pubmed , and recent reviews call for more and higher-quality research before an association can be suggested. Meantime, most folic acid supplements are relatively harmless, if they come from a reliable source. Yet, practice is incredible for my winter dejection.

What has at long last worked this previous year for weight reduction has been two things. One is work out. They are incredible and truly take a shot at your intuitive. I simply hear them out when I get into overnight boardinghouse nod off tuning in to them…and regardless they work. Definitely following a Mediterranean diet is good choice for future health.

Diet and depression

The scientists concluded that these differences may explain some of the fidgeting and restlessness common in children with ADHD. A minority of medical experts have argued that the ADHD diagnosis is overused for children who simply have difficulty adjusting to the structure of classroom life. If you're the parent of such a child, your child may not need medical treatment.

You may just need to exercise more patience and take responsibility for creating the right environment for your child to prosper in school, experts say. To be diagnosed with inattentive ADHD, your child must exhibit six of the following symptoms for at least six months:. To be diagnosed with hyperactive-impulsivity ADHD, your child must exhibit at least six of the following symptoms for at least six months:.

For your doctor to diagnose ADHD, your child must have started showing these symptoms by age 7 and the behaviors must be taking place in more than one situation at school and at home, for example.

Case Presentation

Also, your child's difficulties must be intense enough to significantly harm his social interactions or academic performance. And of course the symptoms shouldn't be due to a physical problem such as hearing loss or poor vision. Make an appointment with your pediatrician if your child's unmindful or impetuous behavior becomes frequent, severe, or begins to affect his ability to get along at home or at school. If his teacher tells you there's a problem -- that your child can't get halfway through a project or repeatedly disrupts lessons -- you'll want to follow up, but don't assume this means ADHD.

A physical or emotional problem could be making him unable to focus or excitable. Or he could have a learning disability such as dyslexia or a neurodevelopmental disorder that makes it hard for him to remember things or acquire language. However, many kids with ADHD also have learning disabilities.

Diet and depression - Harvard Health Blog - Harvard Health Publishing

Your pediatrician can make a preliminary identification of such problems and refer you to someone who will thoroughly assess your child's condition. She'll perform a physical exam of your child and review your medical and social history. She may ask you about your pregnancy, other family members who have been diagnosed with ADHD, and any emotional difficulties your child has gone through.

Your doctor may order tests of your child's vision and hearing to rule out these physical problems. But the result of the test can be useful in the light of results from tests measuring memory, problem-solving, and listening skills. Your doctor will most likely refer you to a child psychologist, who will administer a battery of tests in addition to the IQ evaluation. One of these may be a "continuous performance test," which appraises attention span by having your child do boringly repetitive tasks on a computer. The psychologist will also ask you or your child's teacher to fill out one of the many rating scale forms, which present such questions as "How often does your child pay attention in class?

In addition, your pediatrician or the psychologist will assess your child for the behaviors associated with ADHD. Either may want you to ask your child's teacher to write a letter describing the behavior he's observed, since even a child who's lost in the clouds much of the time may focus in during an office visit. Together, your pediatrician and the child psychologist or other mental health professional can make a definitive diagnosis. There are three: family therapy, behavioral therapy, and medication. Through family therapy or "parent training," you can learn more about ADHD and adjust your expectations for your child.

You can also learn to deal with your own frustration and to parent consistently and positively. Behavioral therapy can teach you how to structure situations at home and school so that your child doesn't become unnecessarily stimulated or distracted.

Meat Heals: An Autoimmune Disease Case for the Carnivore Diet ft. Mikhaila Peterson -- #92

Some medical experts feel that family counseling and behavioral therapy are enough to treat ADHD, while others believe the disorder can be controlled only through the use of medications. Prescription drugs do calm many children with ADHD as well as improve their ability to focus. If a drug is part of the treatment plan for your child, you'll have to work with your child's pediatrician or psychiatrist to find the right dosage. Ironically, the drugs most often prescribed are stimulants, including methylphenidate better known by its brand name, Ritalin and dextroamphetamine Dexedrine.

But the current drug of choice for ADHD is Adderall, an amphetamine; it may have fewer side effects than Ritalin, and its slow-release formulation means kids don't have to take a second dose while they're at school. In addition, your pediatrician or the psychologist will assess your child for the behaviors associated with ADHD. Either may want you to ask your child's teacher to write a letter describing the behavior he's observed, since even a child who's lost in the clouds much of the time may focus in during an office visit. Together, your pediatrician and the child psychologist or other mental health professional can make a definitive diagnosis.

There are three: family therapy, behavioral therapy, and medication. Through family therapy or "parent training," you can learn more about ADHD and adjust your expectations for your child. You can also learn to deal with your own frustration and to parent consistently and positively.

Behavioral therapy can teach you how to structure situations at home and school so that your child doesn't become unnecessarily stimulated or distracted. Some medical experts feel that family counseling and behavioral therapy are enough to treat ADHD, while others believe the disorder can be controlled only through the use of medications.

Prescription drugs do calm many children with ADHD as well as improve their ability to focus. If a drug is part of the treatment plan for your child, you'll have to work with your child's pediatrician or psychiatrist to find the right dosage. Ironically, the drugs most often prescribed are stimulants, including methylphenidate better known by its brand name, Ritalin and dextroamphetamine Dexedrine.

But the current drug of choice for ADHD is Adderall, an amphetamine; it may have fewer side effects than Ritalin, and its slow-release formulation means kids don't have to take a second dose while they're at school. Canadian officials reviewing the manufacturers safety information found 20 international reports of sudden death and 12 incidents of stroke that were not a result of misuse in patients who were taking the drug. Later that year, Canadian officials allowed Adderall back on the market after warning labels were revised to reflect safety concerns.


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The guide warns of the risk of cardiovascular complications and psychiatric problems -- such as hearing voices and paranoia -- in patients with no history of them. Patients or parents of children taking these drugs should talk to their doctors before altering or discontinuing treatment. Then on September 29, , the FDA issued an advisory on atomoxetine Strattera , a non-stimulant ADHD medication, warning of an "increased risk of suicidal thinking" in children and teenagers taking this drug. Researchers believe these medications help modulate levels of neurotransmitters in the brain.

Side effects can include loss of appetite, stomach pain, insomnia, and rapid heartbeat. Some studies suggest that long-term use of stimulants in children can be associated with slow growth. In a review of 22 clinical trials presented to the Pediatric Academic Societies meeting in , researchers reported that attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder drugs like Ritalin do significantly suppress growth in children.

The American Psychological Association estimates that between 70 and 80 percent of children with ADHD respond to medication, with improved attention spans and better control of impulsive behavior. However, stimulants can be habit-forming and seem to benefit adults less than children, so you may want to think about your long-term plan; some parents use medication to address immediate needs but see behavioral therapy as the key to a smoother road for their kids as they mature.

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